The Quest for Meaning:Narratives of Teaching, Learning and the Arts

Author/Editor: Marrie Beatie
Sense Publishers, 2009

Chapter 5:
“The Power of Stories: Tracing the Creating Thread and Healing the Self Whole”
by: Carly Stasko

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The Quest for Meaning: Teaching, Learning and the Arts presents a narrative, arts-based approach to pedagogy and research in higher education. Through narratives of experience, the book offers revealing, poignant examples of the transformative power of the arts and of narrative inquiry in learners’ lives, and of the centrality of story in their ongoing quest for meaning.

The Corporate Assault on Youth: Commercialism, Exploitation, and the End of Innocence.


The Corporate Assault on Youth: Commercialism, Exploitation, and the End of Innocence.
Edited by: Deron Boyles
Peter Lang Publishers, 2008

 

Chapter 6: “Packaging Youth and Selling Tomorrow: Deconstructing the Myths of Marketalkracy”
by:  Carly Stasko & Trevor Norris

 

The Corporate Assault on Youth examines childhood as a social construction increasingly influenced by corporations and commercialism. Through case studies, critical analysis, and historical/philosophical research, the essays collected here expose the degree to which children are unwitting targets of marketing. With topics ranging from the presence of media branding in schools and school supplies to the subtler ways in which the public education system is influenced by corporate ideologies and purposes, this book draws much-needed attention to how educators, administrators, policymakers, parents, and children can become aware of, and counterbalance, the effects of the commercialism that is overwhelming students’ understanding of the world and their place within it.

 

Next Wave Cultures: Feminism, Subcultures, Activism


Next Wave Cultures: Feminism, Subcultures, Activism
Edited by: Anita Harris
Routledge, 2007

 

Chapter 10:
“(r)Evolutionary Healing: Jamming with Culture and Shifting the Power”
by: Carly Stasko

 

This collection provides an interdisciplinary examination of young women’s multilayered lives. Contributors from fields such as education, gender and cultural studies, sociology, psychology and politics – as well as young women themselves – wrestle with both subculture theory and feminism as they attempt to understand contemporary strategies for connection and social action. They also offer insights into an understanding of how today’s young women conceive of their relationships and networks with other young women in the absence of older style feminist frameworks; and what their experiences can offer for the development of more relevant explanations of youths’ social and political identities and cultures.

Girls Who Bite Back: Witches, Mutants, Slayers and Freaks

Girls Who Bite Back: Witches, Mutants, Slayers and Freaks
Editor: Emily Pohl-Weary
Sumach Press, 2004

Chapter 6:
“How to Be Your Own Superhero: A Chronicle of Experimentation And Fascination”
by: Carly Stasko

Taking on the bombshell spies, slayers, witches and assassins who are fighting their way into movies and television shows everywhere, Girls Who Bite Back examines what these new role models for young women are really about. Other contributors include: Superheroes like Sonja Ahlers, Hiromi Goto, Carly Stasko, Sophie Levy, Daniel Heath-Justice, Nalo Hopkinson, Shary Boyle, Zoe Whittall, Larissa Lai.

Turbo Chicks: Talking Young Feminisms

Turbo Chicks: Talking Young Feminisms

Edited by: Lara Karaian, Allyson Mitchell, Lisa B. Rundle
Sumach Press, 2001

Chapter 6:
“Action Girls in the Dream Machine”
by: Carly Stasko

Turbo Chicks is an energetic collection of prose, poetry, theoretical explorations, zines and photo essays. The contributors come from all walks of life, different ages and experiences, sexual orientations, social and cultural backgrounds. Together their pieces build a conversation that is vital to hear. They present issues that feminists struggle with everywhere: how to put convictions into practice, how to talk about race, class, education, ability, sexuality and the privileging of voice. Each contributor identifies ten people who have influenced her and provides her own definition of feminism that broadens the dialogue.